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Aug 3 1996

An angry God makes "Macarena" by Los Del Rio #1 on the pop charts. The accompanying dancing disease afflicts millions before final eradication.

I can't even bring myself to post the YouBoob video



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lmoa!

I use todo the macrenana in line dance while wearing my stesons

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Troll wrote:

Aug 3 1996

An angry God makes "Macarena" by Los Del Rio #1 on the pop charts. The accompanying dancing disease afflicts millions before final eradication.

I can't even bring myself to post the YouBoob video



I bet anything, you were jamming to it when it was popular!



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....or is it Mormon History?

Aug 5 1980

The Osmonds musical group breaks up.



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It was the beginning of Elton John singing about dead blonds.

Aug 5 1962

In her Brentwood, California home, Marilyn Monroe dies in bed, naked, after swallowing an overdose of sleeping pills. Or maybe she's killed by the CIA with a barbiturate enema. Either way, she's dead.



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Troll wrote:

It was the beginning of Elton John singing about dead blonds.

Aug 5 1962

In her Brentwood, California home, Marilyn Monroe dies in bed, naked, after swallowing an overdose of sleeping pills. Or maybe she's killed by the CIA with a barbiturate enema. Either way, she's dead.



Either Joe DiMaggio or Jack Kennedy would have some explaining to do!



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Buckethead wrote:

Troll wrote:

It was the beginning of Elton John singing about dead blonds.

Aug 5 1962

In her Brentwood, California home, Marilyn Monroe dies in bed, naked, after swallowing an overdose of sleeping pills. Or maybe she's killed by the CIA with a barbiturate enema. Either way, she's dead.




Either Joe DiMaggio or Jack Kennedy would have some explaining to do!



A barbiturate enema scares the shit out of me.



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Aug 8 1960

Brian Hyland's song "Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka-Dot Bikini" reaches number one on the pop charts.



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Aug 9 1995

Jerry Garcia dies of a heart attack at Serenity Knolls near Novato, California. He had checked himself into the drug rehab center a few days prior, in hopes of kicking his longstanding heroin habit.



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Aug 16 1938

Blues musician Robert Johnson, who presumably sold his soul to the devil (the story somewhat being told by the movie Crossroads), is poisoned by a jealous husband in Three Forks, Mississippi.

Aug 16 1977

Elvis Presley dies in his home at the age of 42, while sitting on the toilet. In the bathroom, he had been reading The Scientific Search for the Face of Jesus. Presumably, Elvis' search was concluded shortly thereafter.



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Just where did Robert Johnson learn to play. One thing for sure, the facts show that he liked to play more than his guitar.

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Rory Block is probably one of the most accomplished Robert Johnson scholars alive. It's almost like she channels him.

A very hot and very cool lady. And a dog lover to boot... Of course, like most musicians she's produced in ProTools and

http://www.roryblock.com/

-- Edited by Snippy at 15:30, 2008-08-16

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Snippy wrote:

Rory Block is probably one of the most accomplished Robert Johnson scholars alive. It's almost like she channels him.

A very hot and very cool lady. And a dog lover to boot... Of course, like most musicians she's produced in ProTools and

http://www.roryblock.com/

-- Edited by Snippy at 15:30, 2008-08-16



Snippy, never missing a chance to promote Steve Jobs.

Does he pay you a commission, Snipster?



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Snippy, you never cease to surprise me with your musical knowledge. There was a time I could have held my own with you but, unlike you, I stopped paying attention. I never heard of this lady until today but a quick look at her site tells me I've missed plenty.

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A day late, I know, but a August 15, 2008 event.

AP

Jerry Wexler, who as a reporter for Billboard magazine in the late 1940s christened black popular music rhythm and blues, and who as a record producer helped lead the genre to mainstream popularity, propelling the careers of Ray Charles, Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin and other performers, died on Friday at his home in Sarasota, Florida. He was 91.

The cause was congestive heart failure, said his son, Paul.

Wexler was already in his 30s when he entered the music business, but his impact was immediate and enduring. In 1987, the Rock and Hall of Fame recognized his contributions to American music by inducting him in only its second year of conferring such honors.

Wexler actually didn't care for rock 'n' roll, at least as it evolved in the 1960s and '70s. Though he signed Led Zeppelin and eventually produced records by the likes of Bob Dylan, Carlos Santana, Dire Straits and George Michael, his main influence came in the 1950s and '60s as a vice president of Atlantic Records, working largely with black artists who were forging a new musical style, which came to be called soul music, from elements of gospel, swing and blues.

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"He played a major role in bringing black music to the masses, and in the evolution of rhythm and blues to soul music," Jim Henke, vice president and chief curator for the Hall of Fame, said in an interview. "Beyond that, he really developed the role of the record producer. Jerry did a lot more than just turn on a tape recorder. He left his stamp on a lot of great music. He had a commercial ear as well as a critical ear."

Wexler was something of a paradox. A business executive with tireless energy, a ruthless streak and a volatile temper, he was also a devoted music fan. A white man who was a vehement atheist from New York City, he found his musical home in the Deep South, in studios in Memphis and Muscle Shoals, Alabama, among Baptists and Methodists, blacks and good old boys.

"He was a bundle of contradictions," said Tom Thurman, who produced and directed a documentary about Wexler in 2000. "He was incredibly abrasive and incredibly generous, very abrupt and very, very patient, seemingly a pure, sharklike businessman and also a cerebral and creative genius."

The title of Thurman's documentary, "Immaculate Funk," was Wexler's phrase for the Atlantic sound, characterized by a heavy backbeat and a gospel influence. "It's funky, it's deep, it's very emotional, but it's clean," Wexler once said.

Though not a musician himself, Wexler had a natural rapport with musicians, who seemed to recognize his instinct for how best to employ their gifts. In 1950, while he was still at Billboard, he encountered the young singer Patti Page and hummed for her a 1947 song he liked, "The Tennessee Waltz." Her subsequent recording of it sold three million copies in eight months.

A few years later he was a partner at Atlantic, presiding over the 1954 recording session of Ray Charles's breakout hit, "I Got a Woman." He said later that the best thing he had done for Charles was to let him do as he pleased.

"He had an extraordinary insight into talent," Charles, who died in 2004, said in "Immaculate Funk."

Wexler wasn't always a mere listener. In the mid-1960s, at a recording session with Wilson Pickett, Wexler wanted more of a backbeat in the song "In the Midnight Hour" but couldn't explain in words what he wanted, so he illustrated it by doing a new dance, the jerk.

In the late 1960s and '70s, he made 14 Atlantic albums with Franklin, whose musical instincts had been less than fully exploited at her previous label, Columbia. Wexler gave her more control over her songs and her sound, a blend of churchlike spirituality and raw sexuality, which can be heard in hits like "Respect," "Dr. Feelgood" and "Chain of Fools."

"How could he understand what was inside of black people like that?" Pickett asked in the documentary. "But Jerry Wexler did."

Gerald Wexler was born on Jan. 10, 1917, and as a youth, he didn't care for school much; he frequented pool halls and record stores instead, and he went to Harlem jazz clubs at night. In 1936, as something of a last-ditch effort to straighten out her wayward son, Elsa Wexler enrolled him at Kansas State College of Agriculture and Applied Science (known today as Kansas State University) in Manhattan, Kansas. There he first encountered a rural musical sensibility, and a couple of hours away, in the lively musical scene of Kansas City, he could immerse himself in the blues.

Wexler left college after two years, joined the U.S. Army, served stateside during World War II, then returned to Kansas State and finished his degree. By 1949 he was back in New York, married and working as a cub reporter for Billboard.

Wexler's work at Billboard attracted the attention of Ahmet Ertegun of Atlantic Records, then a small independent label focusing on black music. When his partner, Herb Abramson, went into the army, Ertegun asked Wexler to join the company in 1953.

Over the next decade Wexler helped make Atlantic a leader in the recording industry, through his drive, his sales and promotion skills, and, following the business practices of the day, his bribery of disc jockeys to play records. In the 1950s the company produced records by the Drifters, the Clovers, Joe Turner, Ruth Brown and, in partnership with the songwriters Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, the Coasters.

In the 1960s, however, Wexler and Ertegun began to take different paths. Ertegun gravitated toward rock 'n' roll, while Wexler - though he signed Led Zeppelin to Atlantic - was drawn to the niche sounds he found in places like Memphis, where a small label, Stax Records, its principal studio located in a former movie palace, had gathered a mix of black and white musicians and produced a sound based on spontaneity and improvisation.

Wexler brought Otis Redding and Dusty Springfield, among others, to Memphis. (Eventually, Springfield chose to record her vocals in New York.) Later, after hearing a recording Percy Sledge had made at Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, he began producing records there as well, bringing singers like Pickett and Franklin to work with local musicians.

In his autobiography, "Rhythm and the Blues" (Knopf, 1993), written with David Ritz, Wexler wrote candidly and self-critically about a personal life that he acknowledged had been intemperate, replete with adulterous liaisons and profligate drug use.

Given the chance, Wexler would have produced to the end and beyond.

"I asked him once," said Thurman, the filmmaker, "'What do you want written on your tombstone, Jerry?' He said, 'Two words: More bass."'


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