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Post Info TOPIC: Truth, or bullschitt?
Uke


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Railroads having surgeons on duty in rail yards? When I hired on BN in '79 at Hillyard in Spokane, there was a nurse on duty on day shift, week days. Her name was Beryl something... She's been there since it was GN, before the BIG merger of GN, NP, CB&Q, and SP&S that created BN.

Hillyard was named for James J. Hill the big honcho of the GN, and the BN after the merger. Hillyard was a main yard, which was pretty busy until BN switched their main line south to the NP lines on the south-east side of town at Parkwater. A bigger yard, but smaller shop.

Meanwhile Hillyard shop became the big back shop west of the Rockies. The yard was relegated to locals, and one or two routes...

But all the buildings, including the nurse's office remained into the '90s

https://tinyurl.com/ybft2eqz

 



-- Edited by Uke on Friday 27th of July 2018 09:47:42 AM



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James J. Hill headed up the BN? Wow, that dude lived for a real long time.

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Uke


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Sorry about that... I was yakkin' up Hillyard, didn't mean to imply that Big Jim Hill was still around when I hired on. He was in the ground long before my time. But around Hillyard and long timers and old heads, you'd think he was looking over their shoulders as they worked in that old shop.

The head honcho of the BN (Northern Lines) was one Norman Lorentzen by then. After him it was Lou Menk who came aboard from the Frisco when BN bought that outfit.

As far as I remember the BN was pretty good railroad. They seemed to do it right. Maintained their tracks well, cared for their rolling stock, and locomotives. They took care of employees. They cared for their shippers, and seemed to want to keep everybody happy, like one big happy family. Just my impression... Which is probably all wrong, but that's what my impression was back then. I liked working there!



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The BN years 1973-1995 were the best for sure. The BNSF beginning 1995-1998
was not good at all.

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Uke


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After three layoffs (over six years) I reluctantly came back to BN in '92,at Interbay in Seattle. They rehired me as 'carded' journeyman machinist. What a surprise!

Many of the peopleI 'd worked with in Spokane shops (Hillyard, Parkwater, and Yardley) were employed at Interbay. Walking in was like a high school reunion! All those familiar faces. It was good to work with guys I knew, that also knew me. Many of the old heads who'd hired on outa high school were furloughed as well. And the shops closed, or were shuttered forever. Hillyard shop was razed!

Working at Interbay was good. Till rhar day in Sept. '95

The merger with SF had mixed results, and going over the changes that ensued on the Northern Lines have been discussed already. And we've never been able to agree on the whys, and wherefores of that 'merger,' so lset's put that to rest.

After 60/30 came to be, many of the Spokane guys were gone. Many followed their dads into 'the railroad' at Hillyard, via GN, or the NP at Parkwater. They started retiring, and disappearing. New hires and apprentices came in. I found myself cast as an 'old head' that many newbies, and apprentices looked to for asvice, and help with mechanical problems/questions.

Then it all changed...



-- Edited by Uke on Saturday 28th of July 2018 01:11:39 PM

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Uke wrote:

I found myself cast as an 'old head' that many newbies, and apprentices looked to for asvice, and help with mechanical problems/questions.

Then it all changed...


 Dam that wheel lathe......



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Surely, Uncle Warren has forgotten all about that by now.

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Uke


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One would hope... All the Spokane guys have retired. The majority cleared out by about '99-2011-12. A good, solid bunch.

The very last time I visited Interbay RoHo, I recognized about three, or four grunts, and ONE exempt sup. That guy told me they were lookin' ta hire at least a hundred craftsmen.

I asked (jokingly) if they'd hire me... He said "Sure. Just apply!" Hah!

Seems they want to go all GE all the time to reflect the majority of their power.



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Uke wrote:

Seems they want to go all GE all the time to reflect the majority of their power.


 And even if they change the name to Massey-Ferguson or Allis-Chalmers or whatever, 

They are gonna buy what hauls the freight . GE.

They are rebuilding old -9 etc and upgrading to AC, the only market for Extra Maintenance Daily is

to keep a monopoly from forming in Locomotive Manufacture, tho I think its a bit late getting the

barn door closed.



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